Moran Market

Moran Market

Do you know the ‘Girl who has everything?’  Take her to Moran market and she will be sure to find something new!  

 
Look for this Article in print in the July 18th addition in Stars and Stripes:Stripes Korea News Paper.  Also find it on their website at http://korea.stripes.com/travel/moran-market
Seongnam Moran market is the largest traditional market in South Korea.  It is located at the Moran bus terminal and runs on the traditional Korean market schedule.  This means the market is open on days ending in 4 and 9.  Over 1200 merchants, from all over Korea, sell a large variety of products at a 20-30% discount.

The market is most commonly known for the selling of dog meat.  Here, farmers from throughout the country bring farm-raised dogs that have been bred for meat.  Nureongi is the name of the primary breed that is sold here.  Hundreds of dogs are placed in cages.  Just outside of the cages, butchered dog meat can be purchased by the pound.  Whole dogs can also be purchased and butchered on site in back rooms.  The selling of dog meat is illegal in Seoul but not strictly enforced.  Many foreigners find the selling and eating of dog tragic.  The aisle can easily be avoided.  It can be found by taking your first right, into the market when coming from Moran subway station Exit 5. 

Beyond dogs, many farm raised and domestic animals are sold here.  Chickens, ducks, geese, rabbits, and goats fill small cages.  Boxes of baby chicks are also for sale.  As you walk your way down the aisle, men purchasing boxes of chickens weave their way around you with dollies stacked 3 boxes high.

            Just across the way from the farm animal section is the domestic pet section.  Many different breeds of puppies can be purchased here well under pet store prices. Kittens, rabbits, fish and birds are also sold.  Occasionally, it is even possible to find reptiles such as iguanas at the market. 


If you are interested in eastern medicine, herbs and grains, Moran Market has an elaborate section.  Medical Herbs are very important to Korean culture.  At Moran market both traditional Korean herbs and imported medical herbs are sold.  Peongtigimen, a Korean grain, is cooked right at the market in large black containers that fry it.  It is very similar to the process of making popcorn. Nuts, seeds, roots and grains are also sold.

‘Designer’ clothing,  purses, sportswear and sunglasses are sold at the market as well.  There are also small sections with electronics, kitchen wear,  ‘As seen on TV’ merchandise and other unique items.  Often, there are a few merchants selling traditional Korean souvenirs, imported gifts from other places in Asia, statues, pottery and carvings. 

         Head over to the fish market to find a large variety of seafood.  Moran specializes in some unique seafood that you will not find in other fish markets in Korea.  Turtles, perfect for soup, swim in bins.  Slithering snails fill boxes.  Both living and fish on ice are sold here.  If you prefer to purchase “live” fish many of the merchants will prepare them for you on the spot. 

Produce and fruit, coming directly from farms, are displayed at Moran. The fruit is at wholesale prices and very fresh.  Beyond fruit and vegetables Moran market also sells unique foods, drinks and snacks!

            Houseplants, trees, bushes, vegetables and fruit trees are sold in the plant section.  All are sold at great prices, much lower than stores.  Once you have selected your plants, merchants will even pot them for you if you’d like this service.

                        On the opposite side of the animal market, is the food market.  Here you can find a variety of traditional Korean meals to eat.  If you need a break from walking the market, these stalls are a great place to relax and share food or drink amongst friends. 



         


Open: Days ending in 4 & 9:  4th, 9th, 14th. 19th,24thand 29th of each month.
  Hours:  7:00 am – 7:00 pm
  Subway:  Line number 8 Moran Exit number 5.  Walk straight to      the Seognam Bus Terminal. 

 

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